Necessity of Information Governance and Data Classification for Complying With the GDPR

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Necessity of Information Governance and Data Classification for Complying With the GDPR
Necessity of Information Governance and Data Classification for Complying With the GDPR

Necessity of Information Governance and Data Classification for Complying With the GDPR: Coming up to the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will take effect in May 2018 and apply to all companies based in Europe or having personal data of people residing in Europe, many organisations are having difficulty locating their most valuable assets within the organisation – their sensitive data.

Specifically, the new legislation mandates that enterprises avoid any data breach involving personally identifiable information (PII) and that they erase any data if an individual asks that it be deleted. Following the deletion of all personally identifiable information (PII), the firms will be required to demonstrate to the individual and to the authorities that the data has been completely deleted.

The majority of businesses today recognise their responsibility to show accountability and compliance, and as a result, they have begun planning for the new legislation.

There is a plethora of information available on how to safeguard your sensitive data, so much so that it is easy to get overwhelmed and start pointing in numerous directions in the hopes of hitting the target with pinpoint accuracy. If you prepare ahead of time for data governance, you will be able to meet the deadline and avoid fines despite the tight deadline.

Some firms, namely banks, insurance companies, and manufacturers, have vast amounts of data because they are generating data at an accelerated rate, by modifying, storing, and exchanging files, resulting in terabytes and even petabytes of data being generated. It is very difficult for these types of businesses to locate their sensitive data among millions of files, both structured and unstructured, which is, regrettably, an almost impossible task in the vast majority of situations.

According to the definition adopted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the following types of personal identifying information (PII) are categorised as PII:

Most enterprises that hold personally identifiable information (PII) of European residents are required to identify and safeguard against PII data breaches, as well as to delete PII (also known as the right to be forgotten) from the company’s data. Regulation (EU) 2016/679 has been published in the Official Journal of the European Union. On April 27, 2016, the European Parliament and the Council issued the following statement:

It is recommended that “supervisory authorities” monitor the implementation of the provisions of this regulation and contribute to its consistent application throughout the Union in order to protect natural persons in connection with the processing of their personal data and to facilitate the free flow of personal data within the internal market.

Necessity of Information Governance and Data Classification for Complying With the GDPR
Necessity of Information Governance and Data Classification for Complying With the GDPR

It is necessary for the firms that have personally identifiable information (PII) about European people to be able to recognise their data and classify it according to the sensitivity level of their organisational policy in order to support the free transit of PII throughout the European market.

The following is how they characterise the flow of data and the issues faced by the markets:

“Rapid technical advancements and globalisation have posed new issues for the security of personal data, which must be addressed. The amount of personal data being collected and shared has expanded substantially in recent years. Because of technological advancements, both commercial firms and governmental bodies may now make use of personal data on an unprecedented scale in order to carry out their respective tasks. Natural humans are progressively releasing personal information to the public and to the whole world. Technological advancements have transformed both the economy and social life, and the free flow of personal data within the Union, as well as its transfer to third countries and international organisations, should be encouraged in the future, while maintaining a high level of data protection for all individuals.”

Phase 1: Data Detection and Collection

As a result, the first step that has to be performed is the creation of a data lineage that will allow them to identify where their personally identifiable information (PII) is being flung around the company and will assist decision makers in detecting particular sorts of data. The European Union proposes that companies invest in automated technology that can manage vast volumes of data by scanning it automatically. It doesn’t matter how many people are on your team; this isn’t a project that can be completed manually when dealing with millions of different sorts of data that are spread across several locations, including the cloud, storage, and on-premises PCs.

The primary issue for these sorts of enterprises is that if they are unable to prevent data breaches, they will be in violation of the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and may be subject to severe fines.

There are specific employees who must be appointed to be responsible for the entire process, such as a Data Protection Officer (DPO), who primarily deals with technological solutions, a Chief Information Governance Officer (CIGO), who is typically a lawyer who is responsible for compliance, and/or a Compliance Risk Officer (CRO). This individual must be able to maintain comprehensive control over the whole process from beginning to finish, as well as providing complete transparency to the management team and the appropriate authorities.

In particular, the controller should take into account the nature of the personal data, the purpose and duration of the proposed processing operation or operations, the situation in the country of origin, the third country, and the country of final destination, and should implement appropriate safeguards to protect the fundamental rights and freedoms of natural persons in relation to the processing of their personal data.

There are many different types of files that can contain personally identifiable information (PII), including not only PDFs and text documents, but also image documents like scanned checks and CAD/CAM files, which can contain the intellectual property (IP) of a product, as well as confidential sketches and code or binary files. The common technologies available today can extract data from files, which makes it easier to find data that is concealed in text, but the remainder of the files, which in certain businesses, such as manufacturing, may include the majority of sensitive data in picture files, are not as easily identified. These sorts of files cannot be correctly recognised, and without the proper technology, which is capable of detecting personally identifiable information (PII) in file formats other than text, it is easy to overlook this critical information and inflict significant harm to the company.

Phase 2 – Categorization of the data

Data mining operations are carried out in the background by an automated system, which is responsible for this step. The DPO/controller, or the person in charge of information security, must determine whether to monitor certain data, block specific data, or issue notifications in the event of a data breach. In order to carry out these operations, he must divide his data into several groups.

Identifying and categorising structured and unstructured data demands complete identification of the data while preserving scalability – efficiently scanning all databases without “boiling the seas.”

It is also necessary for the DPO to ensure that data is visible across multiple sources and to present all files related to a specific person in a timely manner according to specific entities such as: name, D.O.B., credit card number, social security number, telephone number, and email address, among others.

An information security breach must be reported immediately to the highest level of management at either the controller or processor, or to the information security officer, who will be responsible for notifying authorities of the data breach.

According to Article 33 of the EU General Data Protection Regulation, this breach must be reported to the authorities within 72 hours.

Following the identification of the data by the DPO, the following step should be the labelling and tagging of the files in accordance with the sensitivity level established by the organisation.

Because of the necessity to maintain regulatory compliance, the company’s files must be precisely labelled in order for these files to be monitored both on-premises and when they are shared with others outside the business.

Knowledge is the third phase.

You can easily track and map personal information across networks and systems, whether they’re structured or unstructured, once it’s been tagged. This allows organisations to protect sensitive data while also enabling end users to safely access and share files, thereby improving data loss prevention.

Another issue that must be addressed is safeguarding sensitive information from insider threats, which are workers who attempt to steal sensitive information like as credit cards, contact lists, and other personal information, or who distort the data in order to get some advantage. Without the use of an automated tracking system, it is difficult to notice these sorts of behaviours in real time.

Most firms are faced with these time-consuming chores, which prompts them to look for more effective methods to get insights from their corporate data on which to make their choices.

Understanding inherent data patterns helps organisations get a better understanding of their corporate data and to identify particular vulnerabilities that they may be exposed to.

Integrating encryption technology enables the controller to track and monitor data more effectively, and by implementing an internal physical segregation system, he can create a data geo-fencing system through personal data segregation definitions, cross geo’s / domains, and reports on sharing violation once that rule is violated, among other things. The controller can allow workers to securely communicate communications throughout the business, between the appropriate departments, and outside the organisation without being overblocked by using this mix of technologies.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the fourth phase (AI)

After scanning the data, tagging it, and monitoring it, the ability to automatically filter outlier behaviour of sensitive data and activate protective measures is of greater value to the company in order to avoid these occurrences from developing into a data breach issue. “Artificial Intelligence” is the term used to describe this cutting-edge technology (AI). In this case, the AI function is often consisted of a strong pattern recognition component as well as a learning mechanism in order to allow the machine to make these judgments or, at the very least, to propose a preferred course of action to the data protection officer. This intelligence is assessed by the capacity of the system to get smarter with each scan, with each human input, and with each change in data cartography. Once completed and integrated into an organization’s digital footprint, artificial intelligence functions constitute a vital layer between raw data and the business processes relating to information security, compliance, and management of personal data.

This article was found at: http://EzineArticles.com/9784353

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